Before european hegemony the world system a d 1250 1350

A nice primer on the subject.

Before european hegemony the world system a d 1250 1350

Jun 27, J. The author admits as much in stating that the Portuguese were brutally violent when arriving on the Indian Ocean. This system collapsed around the 14 A somewhat moot argument now, but at the time, Abu-Lughod's work was in the vanguard of synthesizing historiography in a way that made sense, namely by pointing up the relative insignificance of Europe for much of history.

Abu-Lughod asks why and comes up with some convincing, if tentative conclusions.

Abu-Lughod strives to refute ideas like the European miracle and successfully shows that the East at a minimum rivaled the West in trade prior to the 16th century. Abu-Lughod's portrait of a more balanced world is a masterpiece of synthesis driven by one highly creative idea: her world system of interlocking spheres of influence quite literally connected masses of evidence together in new ways. Janet Abu-Lughod's solution to this problem, in this highly influential work, is that Before European Hegemony, a predominantly insular, agrarian world was dominated by groups of mercantile city-states that traded with one another on equal terms across a series of interlocking areas of influence. This system collapsed around the 14 A somewhat moot argument now, but at the time, Abu-Lughod's work was in the vanguard of synthesizing historiography in a way that made sense, namely by pointing up the relative insignificance of Europe for much of history. The main takeaway: Europe came out on top because they literally came in shooting and acting all mafia, in an area where most people didn't behave that way. Author s Bio Summary The modern vision of the world as one dominated by one or more superpowers begs the question of how best to understand the world-system that existed before the rise of the first modern powers. The introduction states that by looking at the world as it enfolded, rather than a regressive chain of effects and their causes, one can separate what happened from what necessarily happened. The most cogent, digestible view of the Italian merchant cities' connections with the Mongol world that I know about. Why does Before European Hegemony Matter? The author admits as much in stating that the Portuguese were brutally violent when arriving on the Indian Ocean. The shift of power to the West in subsequent centuries occurred not because of factors predetermined by Western dominance, but rather because the Eastern system left a vacuum of power that European countries were able to exploit. Hushour rated it really liked it A somewhat moot argument now, but at the time, Abu-Lughod's work was in the vanguard of synthesizing historiography in a way that made sense, namely by pointing up the relative insignificance of Europe for much of history. Shelves: steppe-history , website-widget Much-cited. Concentric rings of influence and events affected adjacent areas throughout the entire area, and this is the meat of the work, describing what this meant for the coasts of India, Muslim powers, and, most importantly, China and southeast Asia. Her thesis gives great weight to the Black Plague which devastated much of this area, which is obvious due to its demographic repercussions.

Yet, the end-result is the same; Europe did develop hegemony after the onset of the black plague. The introduction states that by looking at the world as it enfolded, rather than a regressive chain of effects and their causes, one can separate what happened from what necessarily happened.

By assessing regional power and influence, Abu-Lughod proves that between and the East and the West equaled one another in economic strength.

The discussion ends with China, whose advanced technology, well-developed use of paper money, and strong sea presence granted it ability to link trade along the north-south axis prior to the arrival of the plague. Nothing was special about Europe, nothing was inherent in Europe--in fact, on a technological and economic level, the rest of the world far surpassed European powers at the time. The shift of power to the West in subsequent centuries occurred not because of factors predetermined by Western dominance, but rather because the Eastern system left a vacuum of power that European countries we In Before European Hegemony, Janet Abu-Lughod questions the assumption that European dominance in the 16th century occurred by necessity. Yet, the end-result is the same; Europe did develop hegemony after the onset of the black plague. This system collapsed around the 14th century. Turns out there was nothing to be afraid of: quite an easy read for the curious. The main takeaway: Europe came out on top because they literally came in shooting and acting all mafia, in an area where most people didn't behave that way. This system collapsed around the 14 A somewhat moot argument now, but at the time, Abu-Lughod's work was in the vanguard of synthesizing historiography in a way that made sense, namely by pointing up the relative insignificance of Europe for much of history. The main idea is pretty straightforward: an archipelago of relatively non-aggressive, culturally diverse areas reaching from Egypt to China's eastern seaboard once formed a tidy world system that did not have much to do with backwater Europe. Abu-Lughod's portrait of a more balanced world is a masterpiece of synthesis driven by one highly creative idea: her world system of interlocking spheres of influence quite literally connected masses of evidence together in new ways. The author admits as much in stating that the Portuguese were brutally violent when arriving on the Indian Ocean. I was afraid to sit down and read the actual thing for years, because I'm not an economics person. By assessing regional power and influence, Abu-Lughod proves that between and the East and the West equaled one another in economic strength. Instead, economies and trade routes developed around seven different regions with varying peripheral systems developing around the core.

The shift of power to the West in subsequent centuries occurred not because of factors predetermined by Western dominance, but rather because the Eastern system left a vacuum of power that European countries we In Before European Hegemony, Janet Abu-Lughod questions the assumption that European dominance in the 16th century occurred by necessity.

What does Before European Hegemony Say? Author s Bio Summary The modern vision of the world as one dominated by one or more superpowers begs the question of how best to understand the world-system that existed before the rise of the first modern powers. These factors, while not unique to only Europe, did give it a head start.

before european hegemony summary

A triumph of fine critical thinking.

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Before European Hegemony: The World System A.D. by Janet L. Abu